Archive for December, 2014

Measuring The Health Of Your Gums

11th December, 2014

Every six months and each time we do a dental examination, we check a number of things, not just whether your teeth are decayed but all the many factors that relate to a healthy mouth. One of the major parts of the examination is your gum/periodontal condition. Unhealthy gums are not always obviously spotted so to determine if someones gums are healthy or not the dentist would measure the pockets. To measure gums the dentist uses a specially designed probe which has a ball on the end. The ball on the end stops it being sharp and also helps the dentist to feel hardened debris or any rough edges on restorations.

However the main feature of the probe is the contrasting black band to help show how far the probe can be slid into the edge of the gum. This will give the dentist an accurate score of your perio conditions.

The first band is 3.5 to 5.5 mm from the end of the probe. To measure the perio the mouth is divided up into six sections known as sextants consisting of the upper six front teeth, lower six front teeth and the four back corners.

Whatever the worst score for that particular sextant is, then that’s the score assigned to the whole sextant. So, if the whole sextant were perfect apart from one spot then the whole sextant gets the score of the worst spot. The scores point to the treatment to be carried out.

0 – All is fine in that sextant.

1 – An area of gum bleeds when gently probed – a sign of inflammation.

2 – The ball at the end of the probe can feel roughness due to either calculus (tartar)or due to an edge on a restoration

3 – The probe has gone in far enough to reach the start of the black band (over 3.5mm). This “pocket” is too deep for the patient to get into thoroughly with normal cleaning.

4 – The probe has gone in beyond the end of the first black band back onto the silver area (over 5.5mm) .  Full pocket charting is appropriate.

*  Added if the probe will slide into the area between the roots. Usually tied to a score of 4. This is called furcation involvement. Furcation involvements are very difficult to eliminate.

The BPE scores lead treatment planning but they’re also useful as an easy guide for patients to watch their own progress.

Dry Socket After An Extraction



Whenever you have a tooth extracted, it is generally expected that the wound will heal and recover naturally and usually this is the norm. However sometimes the clot can dissolve too quickly or fall out and then you are left with exposed bone to the air. This is known as a dry socket. A dry socket will generally be extremely painful due to the exposure of the tooth with the main problem being the mouth is left wildly open to bacterial infection

The only remedy is to get yourself to your dentist as soon as you can. The dentist will then dress the wound, which will have to be changed each day. Sutton dentist explains each night you must use anti-bacterial mouth-washes and tread very gingerly around the wound when consuming  food and drink  also when cleaning your teeth until the wound starts to heal over again. During this period, it will be painful, so you will also need to stock up on painkillers to help you!

If you have any questions regarding dry sockets please contact Ninety 2 Dental today

The Importance Of Interdental Brushing



In reality, plaque will always be around in your mouth and if allowed to get out of control, it will lead to gum disease and tooth decay. The most dangerous areas is the place where your brush won’t reach- where the teeth make contact so you have to clean inter-dentally in order to protect your teeth.

Although it may seem a chore and often a little difficult, but there are some brilliant products on the market to help you get by. Dental floss being the most common, It can be worked between the teeth and up under the gums to remove bits of food that may be left there. An alternative to floss is Inter-dental brushes they are brilliant for slipping between the teeth just where the gums meet and pushing food out and away from the gums and teeth. Mouthwashes are very good for the final rinse, to clear away any left over food from the surface of the teeth.

By combining all these things along with a good toothbrush, and making this a regular routine,plaque hasn’t got a chance, and if it does, you always have us to help!