The link between your teeth and your lifestyle

Our lifestyle choices affect our general health, but what some people don’t realise is oral health is also affected by our habits and what we consume. A healthy diet is important for your teeth A healthy diet means foods from different groups, including fruit and vegetables, starchy foods such as rice, pasta, bread and potatoes, some protein-rich food such as fish, meat, eggs and lentils and some dairy too. Limiting your sugar intake is also very important in helping to prevent tooth decay. Have sugary food and drink only at mealtimes and don’t eat sugary snacks between meals.

If you want to keep your teeth as white as possible you should try cutting out substances that can stain them this includes Wine, cigarette smoke, tea and coffee can all discolour teeth. Keep these to a minimum or cut them out completely to help prevent your teeth from becoming stained.

It should come as no surprise that smoking affects your teeth and gums in a bad way. It makes your teeth turn yellow, causes bad breath and increases your risk of gum disease, breathing problems and lung cancer. If you smoke 20 or more cigarettes a day, you’re six times more likely to develop mouth cancer than someone who doesn’t smoke. Excessive consumption of alcohol has also been linked to an increased risk of developing mouth cancer. Alcohol can also erode the enamel on the outside of your teeth, leading to decay. If this happens, you may need to go to the dentist for a filling.

Research has shown that mouth cancers are more common among people over 40, particularly men. It is also becoming more common among younger people and women. Mouth cancer can affect the lips, tongue, cheeks and throat. It can appear as a painless mouth ulcer that does not heal normally. Less often, a white or red patch in the mouth may develop into a cancer.

It is important to see your dentist on a regular basis so they can check for any changes in the mouth or for early signs of decay